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representingid

(no subject)

Aug. 30th, 2006 | 09:20 am
posted by: legacy_tycho in representingid

Heather....

are you around?

I've left my keys somewhere in/around the apartment, so while I trust I will find them, I haven't yet. I don't think I need to come to the room now, but it might be nice to see you at some point while I'm on campus today. I'm free until 10, and then from 11 (well it's a meeting, so it'll probably be sooner or who knows) untill 12, and then from 1 until 2... Probably leaving at 4ish with the Rtron.

anywhoo I'll probably set up in persons but I have my phone with me if you can't find me and want to.

In other news, and the reason I'm posting this to this community is I wrote an email to a psych professor at a grad school I want to go to. It needs a little grammatical polishing maybe and I wanted you to look over it.

Email for Heather ShineCollapse )

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representingid

(no subject)

Aug. 25th, 2006 | 12:14 am
posted by: legacy_tycho in representingid

sorry I suppose this is reviving a dead horse, but....

I have a favor to ask of you, (heather), which will hopefully distract you from the stress of getting ready for school....

I want to post the most recent "course description" for my reading project with (you all and) Suzanne this semester. Current course title: Post-Structuralism and Psychology: Narrative, Methods, and Socio-Cultural Factors in the Study and Practice of Psychology

The aim of this course is to develop the posibiility of a synthetic conversation between post-structural theory, scholorship in the post-structural tradition, and the research and theory of contemporary psychological social science. Structured by a series of four themed encounters the organizing thrust of this project will be a consistant attention to the function narrative in the study of the individual and the role of sociocultural factors in the study of psychological variables. The foundation section of the course will consist of two "units." The first addresses issues realted to incorporating narrative elements in research methodologies, and epistomological issues raised by post-structuralism in the study of psychology. In the second foundation "unit," readings and synthetic work will engauge the relationship between psychological social science and ideas about pathology and mental health. The second (uneven) half of the project, will consist of two shorter synthetic which will combine foundational materail with topical conversations between scholorship in a post-structural tradition and psychological research. One such unit will engauge feminist and queer theoritical notions of identity in conversation with identity as concived by psychologists in a developmental and cognitive framework, with particular attention to elements narrative in identity. The second "topical" unit will engauge the idea of "body" and the study of embodiment in a socio-cultural and cogntive frameworks. Thus the goal ultimitly is not to explain, test, or appropriate post-structuralist thought through emperical psychology, but rather to develop an appropriate means to study narrative in a psychological context that recognizes the relevance socio-cultural variables with the illumination of both psychological and post-structuralist traditions.



make any suggestions you feel. with particular attention to shortening the blasted thing. also, if you think of a good place to insert a phrase about "developmental aspects of" or somesuch point that out too.

thanks as always,

I'll be in the car tomorrow, so I'll talk to you at some point. egad. I want to have the course finalized by friday at the latest, so I can actually do work for it on the weekend. or something.

cheers,
sam

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representingid

Abstract for Home as a Verb

Apr. 15th, 2006 | 09:05 pm
posted by: wildflowerfever in representingid

The lesbian community exists without geographic specificity. As a result, it depends largely upon discourse to create its "reality." During feminism's "second wave," we saw an attempt to articulate the boundaries of lesbian existence, especially in poetry. Tracing a lineage through this poetry--from the canonical texts of "second wave" lesbian-feminism to contemporary "lesbian" and "queer" women's poetry--we explore representations of an emerging lesbian/queer community, as well as the ways that the work itself has contributed to the emergence of such a community.

While many lesbian-feminist poets of the "second wave" were dedicated to what Olga Broumas refers to as "a politics of transliteration"--using poetry to translate the "reality" of lesbian existence--queer theory suggests that there is no such reality. Instead, the label “lesbian” is continually re-interpreted by dominant social paradigms, and thus leaves those who take up the label vulnerable to regulatory norms. Our essay engages texts that explore the tension between these two desires: on one hand, to affirm community identity and on the other, to destabilize such identity categories. Engaging this tension, we ask how lesbian-feminist poetry--in conversation with discourse about identity categories--might serve as a continuously rebuilt home for those who take up the label "lesbian," as well as the benefits and limitations of seeking residence in the label itself.

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representingid

(no subject)

Apr. 5th, 2006 | 01:42 pm
posted by: legacy_tycho in representingid

Carol Guess’ criticism provided a framework for reading queerness in a lesbian feminist tradition, but her poetry allows us to fully realize the potential for queer poetics that utilize identity and create the possibility of continually rearticulating identity. While earlier lesbian poetry was preoccupied the limited shared discourse of lesbian identity, by 2005, Guess’ lesbian discourse is a virtual palimpsest—though a discourse not controlled by a self-identified “lesbian” community. In response, Guess gives flippant titles to her poems. For example, “Unnatural Passions,” “Which One of You is the Man?”, and “But You Two Girls Don’t Have the Right Equipment.” She takes this language and infuses it with her own meaning, yet remains keenly aware that articulation is not always liberatory, and doesn’t express a ‘truth,’ rather, it constructs one.

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representingid

(no subject)

Apr. 5th, 2006 | 01:05 pm
posted by: legacy_tycho in representingid

Similarly, Cherrie Moraga deploys liminal images that are embodied. In “Loving in the War Years,” she writes,
Without a home to call our own
I've got to take you as you come
to me, each time like a stranger
all over again.
Loving you is like living / in the war years,” if any thing, "lesbian existence" is even more charged with the potential for danger in Moraga's conception, than it is for Lorde. This sense is almost palatable when she indicates “Not knowing / what deaths you saw today / I’ve got to take you / as you come, battle bruised.” Lesbian desire, puts women in uncertain 'ways of living' which create danger. In the face of this peril, Moraga is not without hope: “loving in the war years […] where being queer / and female / is as warrior / as we can get.” Though painful, and dangerous, there is a potential for strength that Moraga captures. Moraga's work is often closely associated with that of Gloria Anzaldua—they co-edited the pivotal 1981 volume this bridge called my back: writings of radical women of color. Four years after Moraga's Loving in the War Years: lo que sus labios (1984), a mostly autobiographical meditation on race, sexuality, family and identity, was published Anzaldua elaborates her own personal experience into a theory of identity, language,

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representingid

(no subject)

Mar. 27th, 2006 | 11:50 pm
posted by: wildflowerfever in representingid

Touring-- Audre Lorde

Coming in and out of cities
where I spend one or two days
selling myself
where I spend one or two nights
in beds that do not have the time to fit me
coming in and out of cities
too quickly
to be touched by their magic
I burn
from the beds that do not fit me
I leave sated
but without feeling
any texture of the house I have invaded
by invitation
I leave
with a disturbing sense
of the hard core of flesh
missed
and truly revealing

I leave poems behind me
dropping them like dark seeds that
I will never harvest
that I will never mourn
if they are destroyed
they pay for a gift
I have not accepted.

Coming in and out of cities
untouched by their magic
I think without feeling
this is what men do
who try for some connection
and fail
and leave
five dollars on the table (The Black Unicorn 36-37)

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representingid

(no subject)

Mar. 20th, 2006 | 06:23 pm
posted by: legacy_tycho in representingid

Our experience as young queer people has been, sculpted by our interactions with second wave feminist and "gay and lesbian" literature, coming out narratives, and scholarship. In the face of an experience that we knew to be different, we sought out texts which communicated a way of living which felt familiar and represented identifictory and political practice with which we could subscribe. Not only did these texts shape our understanding of ourselves, but they affected the kind of feminist/queer scholarship that we enguaged as we entered the academy. There, we encountered and theories and discourses of sexuality and gender which sought to destabilize monolithic conceptions of identity, these "politics of destabilization" shape the way we think, act, and construct ourselves, particularly in relation to our decision to take up the term "queer" with pride: nevertheless, we remain critically aware of the tensions between the urge to affirm community identity and the desire to seek liberation through the destabilization of such identity categories

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representingid

Revision, without the nonsense that got in there somehow...

Mar. 16th, 2006 | 06:31 pm
posted by: wildflowerfever in representingid

Queering the Lesbian Canon: (Re)presenting Identity and Community in Lesbian Poetry

During feminism's "second wave," many lesbian-feminist poets were dedicated to what Olga Broumas refers to as "a politics of transliteration"-- using poetry to illustrate the reality of lesbian existence in order to render it visible and thus create a political platform from which to speak. However, the notion that lesbian life contains something translatable implies an essential truth to "lesbian." As queer theory elucidates, this is hardly the case. Instead, the label “lesbian” is continually re-interpreted by dominant social paradigms, and thus leaves those who take up the label vulnerable to regulatory norms.
Our presentation engages texts that explore the tension between these two desires: on one hand, to affirm community identity and on the other, to seek liberation through the destabilization of such identity categories. We wish to trouble this distinction in our exploration of lesbian identity and identity politics, through tracing their development from “second wave” lesbian feminist poetry to contemporary lesbian and queer poetry. We will also interrogate the notion of the 'lesbian canon' itself: when the lesbian "I" is so contentious, is it still possible to bind lesbian texts together under that signifier? How do we engage identity-based texts in the era of queer theory?

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representingid

Abstract for our Symposium Presentation

Mar. 15th, 2006 | 05:41 pm
posted by: wildflowerfever in representingid

During feminism's "second wave," many lesbian-feminist poets were dedicated to what Olga Broumas refers to as "a politics of transliteration"-- using poetry to illustrate the reality of lesbian existence in order to render it visible and thus create a political platform from which to speak. However, the notion that lesbian life contains something translatable implies an essential truth to "lesbian." As queer theory elucidates, this is hardly the case. Instead, the label lesbian is continually re-interpreted by dominant social paradigms, and thus leaves those who take up the label vulnerable to regulatory norms.

Our presentation engages texts that explore the tension between these two desires: on one hand, to affirm community identity and on the other, to seek liberation through the destabilization and elimination of such identity categories. We wish to trouble this distinction in our exploration of identity politics and lesbian identity itself, through tracing their developent from lesbian feminist poetry from the 1970's to contemporary lesbian and queer poetry. We will also interrogate the notion of the 'lesbian cannon' itself: when the lesbian "I" is so contentious, is it still possible to bind lesbian texts together under that signifier? How do we engage identity-based texts in the era of queer theory?

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representingid

(no subject)

Mar. 15th, 2006 | 05:31 pm
posted by: legacy_tycho in representingid

"you talked about kant?"

"no cunt!"

"kant?"

"igna muscio..."

"oh Cunt!"

Sigh. "you're such a bad lesbian"

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